Raisina
Reports

Home 9 South Asia 9 Nepal Elections: 100 days to go, but it’s crunch time

Nepal Elections: 100 days to go, but it’s crunch time

by | Aug 5, 2022 | South Asia

The current term of the Parliament was by all means one of the most controversial tenure of the Parliament where the House of Representatives was dissolved twice and then reinstated too.

Kathmandu: The Wait is finally over for the Nepalese as the Government of Nepal has decided to hold the next parliamentary elections on November 20, 2022. Simultaneous polls will be held on election day to elect representatives for both the federal (national) and provincial parliaments called the House of Representatives and the Provincial Assembly respectively.

The decision to this effect was taken on Thursday, August 4th in a  Nepalese Cabinet meeting chaired by Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba.

The date for elections is two days later than that what the Election Commission of Nepal had recommended. Grapevine has it that Prime Minister Deuba who is also President of Nepali Congress had proposed the date as suggested bt his personal astrologer Suresh Chandra Rijal.

In Nepal, the election dates are suggested by the Election Commission but confirmed only the Federal Cabinet.

Nepal has 165 federal constituencies and 330 provincial ones who will be elected by the common first past the post system. An additional 110 federal and 220 provincial lawmakers will also be elected under the proportional representation system.

The current or fifth House of Representatives was elected in November-December 2017 for a period of five years that ends in March 2023.

The current term of the Parliament was by all means one of the most controversial tenure of the Parliament where the House of Representatives was dissolved twice and then reinstated too. The House was first dissolved in December 2020 by President Bidya Devi Bhandari on the recommendation of the Council of Ministers led by then Prime Minister K P Sharma Oli (of Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist–Leninist)) with elections scheduled for April and May 2021. However, the legitimacy of the dissolution was challenged successfully in the Supreme Court of Nepal and the Apex Court reinstated the House of Representatives.

The House was dissolved weeks later again in May 2021 by the Nepalese President on the recommendation of the same cabinet, with elections scheduled for November 2021 on the pretext that no one had adequate claim to be appointed Prime Minister. The happiness of the Federal Cabinet was short lived as the Supreme Court in July 2021 ruled the dissolution was invalid, and reinstated the House of Representatives, while also ordering the appointment of Sher Bahdur Deuba of Nepali Congress the main Opposition Party as the Prime Minister.

Deuba who has been one of the best survivors in Nepalese politics gets to choose the date of elections in a year where his party Nepali Congress has fared commendably in the local government elections across the country. In 2022 Nepalese local elections held in May this year for 6 metropolitan cities, 11 sub-metropolitan cities, 276 municipalities and 460 rural municipalities, Nepali Congress had an impressive show. It had bagged 329 Mayor, 301 Deputy Mayor, 26e58 Ward Chairperson, 10,442 Ward Members being elected on its 3 stars that is a sum total of 13,730 local self-government posts across the country. With 11,890 seats under its belt, the principal opposition led by Oli’s CPN  (Unified Marxist–Leninist) also isn’t far behind.

With a dramatic rise of Independent Candidates including intellectuals such as scientists, engineers and rappers and country’s leading businessman Dr Binod Chaudhary, Chairman of Nepal’s only multinational conglomerate and Guinness Book of Records bagging TV star Rabi Lamichhane  all in fray for the polls, the nationwide elections of 2022 could just be the game-changing of all elections since it shook off the monarchy to emerge as  Federal Nation.

 

Ajay Thakur
Ajay Thakur
+ posts

Ajay Thakur is a South-Asia based Communication Consultant and Political Communicator.